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Silver Snoopy Awards

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The Silver Snoopy Award was created in 1968 as part of the Manned Flight Awareness (now Space Flight Awareness) program. The idea was to allow the astronauts to recognize the exceptional contributions of individual workers (management are generally excluded) within the vast Apollo program workforce at NASA and its contractors, and the tradition has carried on to this day.

The Silver Snoopy Award consists of a small Sterling silver Snoopy astronaut lapel pin, an official commendation letter, and (usually) an award certficate. The pin itself has always been flown on a manned mission (with the exception of the first few pins as noted below), and the awards are generally presented by a member of the astronaut corps, althought this is not always a crew member of the flight which carried the Snoopy pin.

The rules specify that an individual can only receive one Snoopy Award during their lifetime, although in reality some individuals did receive more than one Silver Snoopy award. It is also specified that not more than one percent of the eligible workforce should receive the award in a particular year. Given the size of the eligible workforce this does not amount to much of a restriction but in fact the number of awards presented each year is small.

The first Silver Snoopy Awards were presented in June 1968 to the four crew members of the LTA-8 project, which tested the Lunar Module in a thermal vacuum chamber. These first pins were not flown in space, and at least one other pin was awarded prior to the flight of Apollo 7. However, thereafter it is assumed that all awarded Silver Snoopy pins were flown.

NASA maintains an online database of Snoopy Award recipients, containing over 12,000 names dating from 1968 to the present, but it's important to note that this database is incomplete, particularly for the pre-Shuttle era. Older data is apparently still being added since in early 2007 the database contained only twelve entries for the entire Apollo era, whereas by late 2009 it contained closer to 500.

Number of Silver Snoopy pins flown per mission

Using the SFA database to count the number of awards presented during the period between the end of one mission and the next may give us some indication as to how many Silver Snoopy pins were carried on each Apollo mission. However, the data is certainly incomplete and in addition some of the award dates in the database appear to be approximations, with many entries on 01/01/69 and 01/01/70 which likely represent cases where the exact date is unknown. These entries distort the data.

In addition, pins carried on earlier missions may have been presented after subsequent missions had flown - a pin awarded in say June 1969 could have been carried on Apollo 7, 8, 9 or 10 - so the result is not going to be definitve. The only 'clean' data is that for Apollo 7, where it can be seen that a minimum of 47 Silver Snoopy pins must have been carried on that mission since at least this number were awarded prior to the splashdown of Apollo 8.

There appear to be many gaps in the SFA data, and the aforementioned approximate dates tend to produce artificial peaks between certain missions, but if we take the total number of recorded awards during the pre-Skylab date range we get an average of 36 pins awarded per mission. Over the period of the three Skylab missions (and prior to ASTP) a total of 207 awards are noted in the database, an average of 69 per flight. It's probably safe to assume the number of pins carried per Apollo misison was somewhere in the range of 50 to 100 at most.

Following the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in 1975 practically no Silver Snoopys were awarded until the completion of the five Shuttle Approach and Landing Test free flights of 1977. Between the last ALT flight and the STS-1 maiden space flight of the Shuttle the SFA database shows 538 awards being presented which would seem to indicate a little over 100 Silver Snoopys being carried on each ALT flight. These are the only Silver Snoopys awarded to-date that were not actually flown in space.

We do have the complete picture for Silver Snoopys carried on recent Shuttle flights as NASA has published the full contents of the Official Flight Kits since the 2001 mission of STS-105. This reveals that between 65 and 250 Silver Snoopys are currently carried per Shuttle flight, with an average of around 140 per mission.

Collecting Silver Snoopy Awards

Whatever the actual numbers, Silver Snoopy pins are popular with space collectors as they are scarce, flown, and have a prestigious history. The fact that the design itself is undeniably cute only adds to their appeal. These pins are also sought-after by Snoopy memorabilia collectors, of which there are legions.

Apollo-era Silver Snoopy Award

A truly complete Silver Snoopy Award would include the lapel pin in its original plastic presentation box, along with the original award letter and certificate (where applicable). Note that in most cases the award documentation does not indicate which mission a pin was carried on.

In practice the documentaton often becomes separated from the pin over the years. The award letter is the least important looking item and the most likely to be discarded if left as part of an estate. The certificates too are frequently lost or thrown out.

If you have a pin without documents but you know the name of the recipient it may be possible to find out when it was awarded from the SFA database of Snoopy Awards but as this is incomplete you may not find the awardee there.

If you have a pin without even the name of the recipient you have no way of ever knowing exactly when it was awarded, although I have identified some characteristics below which may help tie a pin to a particular era. It's worth noting that even an anonymous pin is still valuable to collectors.

In addition to those Silver Snoopys given out as awards a small number were apparently carried by the astronauts themselves as souvenirs. Most of the examples sold to date in the major space auctions come from these sources.


Which mission was my Silver Snoopy pin flown on?

One question that collectors often raise is the issue of which mission a particular pin was flown on. This is of particular interest when it comes to the Apollo era as for example a pin carried to the moon on Apollo 11 would likely be considered much more appealing to collectors than one flown to Earth orbit on Apollo 9.

In reality there are very few cases where you can say with certainty which mission a particular pin was flown on. The clearest cases are the pins carried by certain Apollo astronauts directly in their PPKs, outside of the SFA award program, along with those pins awarded before the return of Apollo 8 which can safely be assumed to have been flown on Apollo 7. A small number of awarded pins were accompanied by letters explicitly stating the mission the pin was carried on, and in the late Shuttle period some pins were actually marked on the backs with the flight id, but these are really the exceptions.

Unfortunately, in all other cases there is no way of knowing for sure which flight a particular pin was flown on.

When it comes to awarded pins, there is generally no link between the astronaut presenting an award and the mission it was flown on. Awards were simply presented by members of the active astronaut corps who were available at the time of the presentation. This means that there is no reason to believe a pin was flown on Apollo 11 just because it was awarded by Armstrong, Aldrin or Collins.

Also, although it would be nice to think that a pin awarded in the months following Apollo 11 was likely flown on that mission there is absolutely no reason to assume this. It would have taken time to process the pins post-flight then to distribute them to various NASA departments and external contractor companies to be awarded. This delay would have varied enormously from case to case but it would likely have exceeded the tiny 8 to 10 week gap between the early Apollo missions in many cases. Thus it seems almost certain that some pins awarded after Apollo 11 and before the return of Apollo 12 were actually carried on Apollo 10 or even Apollo 9 just a few months previously. There is simply no way of knowing for sure.

I have seen a concrete example from the Shuttle era of this mismatch between award date and mission that demonstrates just how extreme it can be. A pin presented in May 1994 not long after the flight of STS-59 might have been assumed to have been carried on that flight but in fact this particular pin was accompanied by a NASA letter that explicitly stated that it was one of those carried on the STS-34 mission in October 1989, nearly 5 years and over 30 Shuttle flights previously. This is unlikely to be an isolated example.

I realize that this kind of uncertainty is very frustrating for collectors but I believe that it's necessary to accept that in most cases you will never know which mission a particular Silver Snoopy pin was carried on.


FLOWN availability - Silver Snoopy pins occasionally turn up on auction sites such as eBay and a few have been sold in the major space auctions over the years. Most of the latter come direct from the collections of astronauts, and thus were never actually awarded. Pins sold on eBay without any accompanying documentation tend to sell for anywhere between $200 and $1,300+, with an average of maybe $500. Those with accompaying documentation are a minority, and generally sell at a premium.

Unflown availability - In general all Silver Snoopy pins are assumed to be flown, although if the original award pin is lost NASA will apparently provide an unflown replacement example to the awardee. It is worth noting that there are many fake military pins and badges out there so we can't to rule out the possibility that fake Silver Snoopys may exist (see Snoopy variant X below). With this in mind I would say that it is definitely worth paying extra for an example with established provenance.


Silver Snoopy Award pin variants

Those Silver Snoopy pins bearing an "r" or "R" Sterling hallmark on the reverse are believed to have been manufactured by the Robbins Company of Attleboro, Mass. The pins are made of Sterling silver, measure approximately 9.5mm x 12mm (3/8" x 1/2"), and weigh roughly 1.5g (0.05oz) without the clasp. Most people are surprised at just how tiny these pins are when they first see one in person.

When I began studying Silver Snoopy pins in detail some years ago no-one had really looked at the possibility that the design had changed significantly over the years. Of course, given that these pins have been produced for over forty years it shouldn't be surprising to find some differences between pins from different eras.

Although the design of the front - based on a drawing produced specially for the purpose by Snoopy creator Charles M. Schulz - has not changed signficantly, distinct variants can be identified by differences on the reverse, specifically the text and location of the Sterling silver hallmark stamp, the style and location of the pin attachment, and the location of the United Feature Syndicate copyright text. These differences are detailed below for the examples I have found to-date.

My intial impression when I began trying to identify distinct styles was that there were perhaps three variants of the Silver Snoopy pin - one Apollo-era, one early Shuttle and one later Shuttle era. However, when I started to compare examples from a few Apollo missions I soon found that there were many more variants than this. My impression now is that, at least in the Apollo era, pins were probably ordered in small batches sufficient to cover maybe one to four flights, and that the pin, hallmark and copyright text on the reverse were positioned differently for each manufacturing run.

It's important to understand that it is quite possible that pins from the end of one manufacturing run would have been carried on a flight alongside new pins from a subsequent production run. This could make it very difficult, maybe even impossible, to tie a given pin to a specific flight based purely on the details on the reverse.

With over 20 distinct variants seen so far we can draw at least one preliminary conclusion regarding the age of those pins bearing a Robbins hallmark. The lowercase "r" Robbins hallmark appears to have been used throughout the Apollo era. By the time of the first Shuttle flights (or at least by 1983) this had been replaced by an uppercase "R" hallmark which continues to be used to this day. This at least allows us to assign most pins to one of two broad age ranges. There is a slight complication to this simple story, with some pins without any Robbins hallmarks possibly having been produced after the end of the Apollo era (post-ASTP) and prior to STS-1 and having been flown on the ALT missions.

Note that fronts of individual pins can look quite different in photos depending on the lighting type and angle, and on the condition of the pin surface in terms of tarnishing, polishing or wear. In reality the fronts are almost identical in design, with the notable exception of the those lacking the Robbins hallmark.

NB: The variant numbering given below is arbitrary and subject to change as new variants are identified and existing ones are associated with different dates. Had I realized just how many variants there were when I began this classification I might have chosen a different system but for now this will have to do. External references to these variant numbers are probably best avoided as they will likely to lead to confusion.






Silver Snoopy pin variants with lowercase Robbins hallmark

The Silver Snoopy pins in this group all bear a lowercase "r" Robbins hallmark, which appears to date their manufacture to the Apollo through early Shuttle period, with the end point coming somewhere between 1982 and 1985.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant 0
Hallmark: STERLING r
Hallmark position: Below copyright text
Pin attachment: Vertical pinback clasp
Copyright position: Center
Known dates awarded: Possibly Apollo 7 or 8

This pin was sold on eBay without any identification or paperwork. This pin has a vertical pinback clasp which matches those of known Apollo 9 and 10 examples but has the Sterling hallmark in a different location on the reverse. The logical conclusion is that this pin probably comes from either the Apollo 7 or 8 missions. although it's impossible to confirm this without seeing other examples from those flights.


Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XIV (14)
Hallmark: STERLING r
Hallmark position: Above copyright text
Pin attachment: Vertical pinback clasp
Copyright position: Low center
Known dates awarded: Possibly Apollo 7 or 8

This pin was sold on eBay without any identification or paperwork. Another pin without paperwork and with a vertical clasp, this does not match the variant above or the Apollo 9/10 variant below. The implication is that it likely comes from Apollo 7 or 8.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant IV (4)
Hallmark: STERLING r (tall)
Hallmark position: Lower center
Pin attachment: Approx 1/3 way from top
Copyright position: Immediately below pin attachment
Known dates awarded: March 18, 1969
Confirmed flights: Apollo 9 & 10

Jim McDivitt carried examples of this variant of pin on the Apollo 9 flight in March 1969, and Tom Stafford carried some on Apollo 10 in May 1969. A matching example was also awarded by Frank Borman on March 18, 1969, just a few days after the Apollo 9 splashdown. Examples of this variant could also have been carried on Apollo 8. The fact that this pin has a clutchback rather than a vertical pin-back design adds to the confusion of trying to tie pin designs to dates or missions, as I had previously thought that the vertical pin-back was indicative of pins from Apollo 10 and earlier.

A further update regarding this pin variety is that Dave Scott carried at least one example in a suit pocket during the Apollo 15 mission. It is possible that he acquired the pin at the time of the Apollo 9 mission then carried it with him on Apollo 15.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant I
Hallmark: STERLING r
Hallmark position: Top right, vertical
Pin attachment: Vertical pinback clasp
Copyright position: Center
Known dates awarded: Apollo 10

Tom Stafford apparently carried at least one of these pins on Apollo 10 in May 1969.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XX (20)
Hallmark: r (tall) STERLING
Hallmark position: Center
Pin attachment: Vertical pinback clasp
Copyright position: Lower center (under clasp)
Known dates awarded: Unknown

This pin has no known award date but the vertical clasp on reverse would seem to indicate an early example. The hallmark differs from the other types seen so far with certical clasps.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XV (15)
Hallmark: r STERLING
Hallmark position: Top center
Pin attachment: Vertical mid point
Copyright position: Lower center/left
Known dates awarded: 1969

This pin was awarded in September 1969. This date, combined with the fact that the reverse features a straight pin rather than the vertical clasp associated with some known Apollo 9/10 versions would seem to indicate that this may have been carried on Apollo 11, but this is far from certain.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant VIII (8)
Hallmark: STERLING r
Hallmark position: Top center
Pin attachment: Vertical mid point
Copyright position: Lower center
Known dates awarded: Early 1970

Although awarded in early 1970, the award letter that accompanied this pin was signed by Buzz Aldrin which might be taken to imply an Apollo 11 link. It seems however that the awarding astronaut was not necessarily related to the mission on which a pin was flown so this pin could be from Apollo 12, as indicated by the date.

Confusingly, the very small Sterling hallmark with short "r", and the low copyright text differentiate it from the variant III pins known to have been carried on Apollo 12 and 13, which leaves this as a mystery.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant III (3)
Hallmark: STERLING r (tall)
Hallmark position: Top center
Pin attachment: Just above vertical
mid point
Copyright position: Immediately below
pin attachment
Known dates awarded: Apollo 12 & 13


Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant V (5)
Hallmark: STERLING r
Hallmark position: Close to top
Pin attachment: Vertical mid point
Copyright position: Immediately below pin attachment
Known dates awarded: Dec 1969


Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXVI (26)
Hallmark: STERLING r
Hallmark position: Close to top
Pin attachment: Above vertical mid point
Copyright position: Immediately below pin attachment
Known dates awarded: unknown

Although very similar in layout to variant V this seems to be a distinct version. The "r" mark seems to have a slightly more distinct serif, the pin is mounted higher, and the UFC copyright text is also slightly higher up the pin.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant VI (6)
Hallmark: STERLING r
Hallmark position: Below arm level
Pin attachment: Center of head
Copyright position: Lower center to
bottom of pin
Known dates awarded: unknown


Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXIII (23)
Hallmark: STERLING r
Hallmark position: Bottom
Pin attachment: Upper Center
Copyright position: Lower center
Known dates awarded: January 1981

The details on the back of this variant are similar to variant IV but the text is positioned further down the pin. Although the first example of this variant that I saw was 'orphaned' (without documentation) a second example has now surfaced which was apparently presented in January 1981. This would imply the pin may have been carried on one of the Shuttle Enterprise ALT flights.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XIX (19)
Hallmark: STERLING r
Hallmark position: Top
Pin attachment: Center
Copyright position: Lower center
Known dates awarded: Mar 9 1982

This Silver Snoopy pin was awarded on Mar 9 1982, which means it was likely carried on either STS-1 or STS-2.








Silver Snoopy pin variants with uppercase Robbins hallmark

The Silver Snoopy pins in this group all bear an uppercase "R" Robbins hallmark, which appears to date their manufacture to the early Shuttle period (from around 1982 to 1985) through to the modern day.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXV (25)
Hallmark: STERLING R
Hallmark position: Bottom of pin
Pin attachment: Lower half of head
Copyright position: Immediately below pin attachment
Known dates awarded: Jul 1983

This Silver Snoopy pin, although awarded in July 1983, is believed to have been flown on STS-2.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XVIII (18)
Hallmark: R STERLING
Hallmark position: Lower center
Pin attachment: Pinback clasp mounted diagonally behind head
Copyright position: Center
Known dates awarded: Sep 1985

This Silver Snoopy pin, awarded in September 1985 following the STS-51I mission, shows the re-introduction of a clasp mechanism on the reverse. Previously I had only seen this in examples from early Apollo missions.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant VII (7)
Hallmark: R STER.
Hallmark position: Top center
Pin attachment: Lower half of head
Copyright position: Lower center
Known dates awarded: STS-27 (Dec 1988) ; STS-30 (May 1989) ; STS-34 (Oct 1989)

Whilst most of the above variants have near identical designs on the front, the pins I've seen from Shuttle flights all have a distinct mass of metal visible between Snoopy's scarf and the hand holding the case. In earlier variants there is a clean divide between the hand and scarf.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant IX (9)
Hallmark: R STER
Hallmark position: Below copyright
Pin attachment: Upper center of head
Copyright position: Below midpoint
Known dates awarded: STS-45 (1992)


Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXII (22)
Hallmark: R STER.
Hallmark position: Below copyright
Pin attachment: Upper center of head
Copyright position: Below midpoint
Known dates flown: STS-95 (1998)

At least one of these pins was flown on STS-95 in 1998 (awarded in 2004), although variant 13 pins are also known to have been carried on this flight. The details on the back are similar to the STS-45 version above but the Sterling hallmark is larger with a distinct dot at the end.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXXII (32)
Hallmark: R STER.
Hallmark position: Below copyright
Pin attachment: Lower center of head
Copyright position: Below midpoint
Known dates flown: STS-128 (2009)

One of these pins flown on STS-128 in 2009 was awarded in 2014. The details on the back are similar to variant 22 above but there is no dot after the "STER" and the cutaway under Snoopy's extended left arm is less rounded.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XIII (13)
Hallmark: R STER
Hallmark position: Below copyright
Pin attachment: Upper center of head
Copyright position: Below midpoint
Known dates flown: 1996 & 2001

Although the layout and details of the hallmark and copyright marks on the back of this pin are very similar to the STS-45 example above, this pin has a much deeper cut-out under Snoopy's left arm.

Pins of this variant are known to have been flown flown on STS-76 (1996), STS-95 (1998), and STS-105 (2001), with these pins being awarded in 1998, 2008, and 2002 respectively.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XII (12)
Hallmark: R STER.
Hallmark position: Top center
Pin attachment: Center of head
Copyright position: Lower center
Known dates awarded: STS-109 (2002)


Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXX (30)
Hallmark: R STERLING
Hallmark position: Top center
Pin attachment: Just above vertical mid point
Copyright position: Lower center
Known dates awarded: Unknown.

The Robbins hallmark at the top left of this pin seems to be an uppercase version but with the top section truncated. Unfortunately the only example of this pin I've seen to-date had no provenance.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXXI (31)
Hallmark: R STERLING
Hallmark position: Top center
Pin attachment: Just above vertical mid point
Copyright position: Lower center
Known dates awarded: Unknown.

The details on the back of this pin are very similar to variant XXX above, the main difference being that the "R" is fully-formed in this version. It also seems like the "STERLING" lettering is slightly larger on this version. As with the variant above, the only example of this pin I've seen to-date had no provenance.








Silver Snoopy pin variants without a Sterling hallmark

The two pins to fall into this group so far are identified below.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XVI (16)
Hallmark: none
Hallmark position: n/a
Pin attachment: Vertical mid point
Copyright position: Lower center
Known dates awarded: unknown

I've now seen two examples of this pin type, so my initial theory that the missing hallmark stamp might be a manufacturing error is no longer valid. The design of the pin is consistend with Robbins examples but why it should be lacking a Sterling and Robbins hallmark is unclear.

The first example I saw came from the collection of astronaut Jim McDivitt. It was not identified as flown, and given McDivitt's long career at NASA (1962-1972) and subsequent career at Rockwell (from 1981 to the 90s) the pin could really have come from any period.

The second example is part of the Irwin family collection. In fact Irwin was the only astronaut to be awarded a Silver Snoopy pin - one of the very first examples, awarded as a result of the LTA-8 tests - but we don't know if this pin was the one awarded or one he was given by another astronaut or took with him as a souvenir on Apollo 15.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXIX (29)
Hallmark: none
Hallmark position: n/a
Pin attachment: Center of head
Copyright position: Bottom center
Known dates awarded: STS-36 (1990)

Again it's not clear why this pin is missing a Sterling or Robbins hallmark. The only example I've seen so far appears to have been flown on STS-36 in 1990.








Silver Snoopy pin variants without a Robbins hallmark but with raised UFC copyright text

The Silver Snoopy pins in this group lack a Robbins "r" or "R" alongside the Sterling hallmark on the reverse, implying that they might have been produced by another manufacturer. However, these pins are otherwise very much like the regular "r" Robbins pins of the Apollo to early Shuttle era - they have raised UFC copyright text, and the Snoopy designs on the front don't have the distinctive cross-eyed appearance common to the other subset of non-Robbins-hallmark pins identified below. This would tend to imply they may well have been produced by Robbins, despite the lack of "r".

Unfortunately, none of the examples seen thus far has been accompanied by award documentation so their origin remains a mystery.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXIV (24)
Hallmark: STERLING
Hallmark position: Lower center
Pin attachment: Approx 1/3 way from top
Copyright position: Center
Known dates awarded: Unknown

This pin falls into the group of variants lacking the Robbins "r" hallmark but with raised UFC copyright text rather than stamped. The only example seen so far had no documentation.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXVII (27)
Hallmark: STERLING
Hallmark position: Top
Pin attachment: Above center
Copyright position: Botom center
Known dates awarded: Unknown.

This pin falls into the group of variants lacking the Robbins "r" hallmark but with raised UFC copyright text rather than stamped. The only example seen so far had no documentation.








Silver Snoopy pin variants without a Robbins hallmark and with stamped UFC copyright text

The Silver Snoopy pins in this group all lack a Robbins "r" or "R" alongside the Sterling hallmark on the reverse, implying they may have been produced by another manufacturer. Interestingly, all these pins also share some distinct differences (apart from the lack of Robbins mark) from the other variants identified thus far.

Comparative detail of Robbins-hallmarked pins (top row)
and examples without a Robbins hallmark (lower row)

On the fronts, the Snoopy design itself shows some notable differences from the Robbins versions. The top row in the image on the right shows close-up details of some typical Robbins variants while the lower row shows the same areas of the three variants in this subset seen so far.

The yellow arrows highlight two short 'dashes' in the upper right area of the helmet that are clearyly visible on all three non-Robbins-Hallmarked. On the Robbins hallmarked variants there are actually three longer but fainter lines running slightly higher up the helmet, which are barely visible in most photos.

More obviously, all three non-Robbins-Hallmarked pins show a distinctly cross-eyed Snoopy, with the relative position of the eyes quite different to that seen on all the Robbins-hallmarked variants.

Another common feature of these pins is that the United Feature Syndicate copyright text on the reverse is stamped, as opposed to the raised text common to all other versions.

Although none of the pins of this type seen thus far has been accompanied by award documentation one new example was tied to a specific award date immediately following the final Shuttle ALT flight. This would make it one of the many examples awarded between the completion of those flights and the launch of STS-1 and may suggest that these pins were produced exclusively in this period, being replaced by the upper-case "R" Robbins pins at the time of the first Shuttle missions.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant II (2)
Hallmark: STERLING
Hallmark position: Bottom right
Pin attachment: Vertical mid point
Copyright position: Top center (stamped)
Known dates awarded: Unknown.

This pin falls into the group of variants lacking the Robbins "r" hallmark. As with the other variants in this group the UFC copyright text on the reverse is stamped rather than raised and the Snoopy design is rather cross-eyed. (Note that in the pictures above the pin is angled slightly which distorts the shape somewhat).

The owner of this pin believes that it was from the Apollo 11 mission but it is difficult to draw any definitve conculsions about this variant without more examples. The discovery of variant XV which has tangible evidence tying it to Apollo 11 would tend to imply this mystery pin has other origins.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XVII (17)
Hallmark: STERLING
Hallmark position: Bottom (upside-down)
Pin attachment: Vertical mid point
Copyright position: Upper right (stamped)
Known dates awarded: Unknown

Another mystery pin sold without any background information or documentation this variant shares the features of the other pins lacking the Robbins "r" hallmark, including the stamped UFC copyright text on the reverse and the somewhat cross-eyed Snoopy. This particular variant has a weakly- stamped upside-down STERLING hallmark in different lettering to that of variant II or XXI.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXVIII (28)
Hallmark: STERLING
Hallmark position: Near bottom (upside-down)
Pin attachment: Slightly above center
Copyright position: Upper center (stamped)
Known dates awarded: Oct 31 1977

Although sold without documentation this pin is believed to have been awarded in 1977, almost immediately following the last of the Shuttle Approach and Landing Tests. This would tend to imply that this was one of the pins flown on those missions.
Although the upside-down hallmark on this pin is very similar to the variant XVII pin shown above, the stamped UFC copyright text is positioned higher and more centrally at the top of the pin.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant XXI (21)
Hallmark: STERLING
Hallmark position: Lower center
Pin attachment: Vertical mid point
Copyright position: Upper left (stamped)
Known dates awarded: Unknown

Another pin lacking the Robbins "r" hallmark, featuring stamped UFC copyright text and a rather cross-eyed Snoopy.








Replica / fake Silver Snoopy pins

The value of Silver Snoopy pins makes it likely that fakes have been or will be produced at some stage. These may prove very difficult to identify, which is why a premium should always be placed on pins with solid provenance. To-date the only identified non-NASA Silver Snoopy pin (detailed below) is apparently a Hollywood replica as opposed to an outright fake.



Description: Silver Snoopy Pin
Model: Variant X (10)
Hallmark: None
Hallmark position: n/a
Pin attachment: Above arm level
Copyright position: None
Known dates awarded: Unknown

This odd-looking pin was sold via eBay in December 2009. The seller had no accompanying documentation or information on its origins. Based on the crude finish, clear differences in design, and complete lack of hallmark and copyright information on the rear, my suspicion is that this is a fake or replica pin.

Update: Apparently several replica Silver Snoopy pins were made as props for the HBO series "From the Earth to the Moon" and this is likely an example of one of these prop pins.




Annex: Apollo-era Silver Snoopy Award pins sold at auction or identified in private or museum collections

Mssn.AstronautAwardeeCompanyAwardedVar.Sold viaSale DateLot no.PriceReference / Notes
AS7SchirraAstronaut's personal collectionAuroraApr 27 200275$2,300Part of presentation.
AS7SchirraAstronaut's personal collectionOdysseyMar 26 199570UNSOLD
AS7SchirraAstronaut's personal collectionOdysseyFeb 27 199484$978
AS7OdysseyMar 26 199594UNSOLD
AS7CunninghamAstronaut's personal collectionSwannMar 27 2004122$1,495
AS7CunninghamAstronaut's personal collectionOdysseyFeb 27 1994150UNSOLD
AS8LovellSharon CaffeeNASAMay 27 1969SwannMar 31 200793$3,430
unknownJoe EngleunknownRockwellJul/Aug 1969rIVLunar LegaciesJun 2 2012216$620No docs ; Auction listing 
AS9McDivittAstronaut's personal collectionrIVAstronautCentral41206$1,500Direct sales via website 
unknownMcDivittAstronaut's personal collectionAstro-AuctionJun 11 2008$310Not identified as flown
unknownMcDivittAstronaut's personal collectionXVIAstro-AuctionunknownunknownNot identified as flown
eBaySep 10 2011$1258.21Auction listing 
AS9McDivittAstronaut's personal collectionAstro-AuctionJul 6 2008$3,900
AS10StaffordAstronaut's personal collectionChristiesSep 18 1999114$2,760Listed as LM flown.
Auction listing 
AS10StaffordAstronaut's personal collectionrIVChristiesMay 9 2001246$3,173Listed as LM flown.
Auction listing 
AS10StaffordAstronaut's personal collectionHeritageOct 6 200841172$2,988Listed as LM flown.
Auction listing 
AS10StaffordAstronaut's personal collectionrIDirect PurchasePrivate collection
AS11?GibsonEdward S ShannonNAASep 25 1969rXVFlorida AuctionsAug 6 201173a$3,861Auction listing 
AS11?AldrinAlice CorbinNAArVIIIeBayMay 30 2010$3,569Auction listing 
AS12GordonAstronaut's personal collectionSuperiorJun 25 1994617$863
AS13HaiseAstronaut's personal collectionSwannApr 2 2005173$2,185
AS13HaiseAstronaut's personal collectionSwannApr 17 2008139$2,940
AS13HaiseAstronaut's personal collectionBonhamsJul 16 2009244$2,196Auction listing 
AS13HaiseAstronaut's personal collectionBonhamsApr 13 20101223$5,185Auction listing 
AS13HaiseAstronaut's personal collectionBonhamsMay 5 2011200$7,564Auction listing 
AS15IrwinAstronaut's personal collectionOdysseyMar 26 1995173$978Listed as LM flown.
Private collection 
AS15ScottAstronaut's personal collectionrIVRRAuctionNov 29 2012516$9,144Carried in suit pocket.
Auction listing 
AS16DukeDonald T. VermilyeRCAMay 10 1972Lunar LegaciesMar 14 2009346$600With letter.
Auction listing 

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